Humanities Question

1 Essay Outline Student name: XXX Section: Genocide Literature (Sec.701) Original Title of Student Essay: The Echoes of Genocide: An Analysis of ‘Nimkii’ and its Depiction of Anishnaabe History INTRODUCTION The touching story “Nimkii” from the anthology “This Place: 150 Years Retold” follows Anishnaabe lady Nimkii. As a victim of the Sixties Scoop, which forced thousands of Indigenous children into non-Indigenous foster or adoption homes, Nimkii recounts her ordeal. The story also discusses Nimkii’s parents’ residential school experience. Nimkii’s account provides a personal and cultural perspective on the Anishnaabe genocide. This article will examine how “Nimkii” illuminates these events and their ongoing effects on the Anishnaabe culture. Discussion Topics in Point Form 2 1. The Sixties Scoop and its impact on Nimkii’s life. 2. The mental effects of abuse in residential schools. 3. The incorporation of traditional Indigenous stories and beliefs in Nimkii’s narrative. Clear Thesis that Answers the Question This paper will demonstrate that literature, in particular “Nimkii”, provides a personal and cultural approach to the impact of genocidal events against the Anishnaabe people. BODY PARAGRAPH 1 Topic Sentence: The Sixties Scoop was a genocidal event that had a profound impact on Nimkii’s life. Textual Example from Primary Text: “After they stole me from my mom, I bounced from foster home to foster home, by the time I was 13, I had moved ten times.” (Akiwenzie-Damm, Howe & Storm, Yaciuk, 2019, p.149) Analytical Points that Support Topic 3 1. The Sixties Scoop was one of the policies adopted by the Canadian government, which led to the removal of thousands of Aboriginal children from their families. They were placed in non-Indigenous foster or adoption homes. 2. This policy was a direct assault on Indigenous cultures and identities, for it aimed at assimilating Indian children into mainstream Canadian society. 3. Nimkii’s own story shows the significance of this policy for Indigenous children. Clear Link Between Topic and Thesis Nimkii’s experience with the Sixties Scoop provides a personal perspective on this genocidal event, thereby expanding our understanding of such events against the Anishnaabe. BODY PARAGRAPH 2 Topic Sentence The mental effects of abuse in residential schools are another aspect of genocide against the Anishnaabe. Textual Example from Primary Text “I remember how it felt when I’d snuggle up beside her, curling into her like I was the inner fronds of a fern, and she was the outer stalk curled around me.” (Akiwenzie-Damm, Howe & Storm, Yaciuk, 2019, p.144) 4 Analytical Points that Support Topic 1. Abuse at residential schools can cause trauma and longing for lost family bonds, as seen in Nimkii’s remembrance of her mother. 2. 2. Residential schools were places where Indigenous children were forcibly abducted from their families and abused physically, emotionally, and sexually. 3. The trauma at these schools has continued to impact Indigenous communities, leading to high rates of mental health concerns, substance misuse, and suicide. Clear Link Between Topic and Thesis The mental effects of abuse in residential schools, as experienced by Nimkii and her family, provide a personal perspective on the genocidal events against the Anishnaabe. BODY PARAGRAPH 3 Topic Sentence The incorporation of traditional Indigenous stories and beliefs in Nimkii’s narrative provides a cultural perspective on genocidal events. Textual Example from Primary Text: 5 “And that, my girl, is the story of Sky Woman, Ghiizhigokwe, and how we came to be here on Turtle Island.” (Akiwenzie-Damm, Howe & Storm, Yaciuk, 2019, p.142) Analytical Points that Support Topic 1. These myths and beliefs demonstrate Indigenous cultures’ persistence against genocide. 2. Despite attempts to obliterate Indigenous traditions, myths and beliefs persist as a kind of resistance against cultural genocide. 3. Nimkii’s narrative contextualizes genocidal events through traditional stories and beliefs. Clear Link Between Topic and Thesis The incorporation of traditional Indigenous stories and beliefs in Nimkii’s narrative expands our understanding of genocidal events against the Anishnaabe by providing a cultural perspective. CONCLUSION Review of Essay Arguments 6 The essay argues that “Nimkii” explores the Sixties Scoop, the mental repercussions of residential school trauma, and traditional Indigenous myths and beliefs to better explain Anishnaabe genocidal events. Restatement of the Thesis restatement: This paper will demonstrate that literature, in particular “Nimkii”, provides a personal and cultural approach to the impact of genocidal events against the Anishnaabe people. Oher arguments: The exploration of the role of names and identity in Indigenous cultures, as exemplified by Nimkii’s experience of having her name changed to “Nicki”. Further Areas for Exploration Further research could explore other Indigenous narratives and their perspectives on genocidal events. 7 The Role of Literature in Promoting an Understanding of the Impact of Genocidal Events Against the Anishnaabe XXX (XXX) Centennial College Genocide Literature (SEC. 701) Professor Jit Shalin February 11, 2024 8 The Role of Literature in Promoting an Understanding of the Impact of Genocidal Events Against the Anishnaabe The genocide of the Anishnaabe people is a tragic part of history. However, it is still aligned with modern writings as a way of representing the ongoing agonies of the indigenous communities. This paper seeks to investigate the points where literature intersects with the ongoing genocide against the Anishnaabe, focusing on the novel Nimkii by Akiwenzie-Damm, Howe, Storm, and Yaciuk (2019). Bearing Nimkii, an indigenous girl, in sight, this work depicts darkly the atrocities perpetrated upon the Anishnaabe people, exposing the systemic violence, dispossession, and cultural erasure they suffered. Through the analysis of how indigenous beliefs and stories are incorporated, the mental effects of abuse in residential schools, and the impact of the Sixties Scoop on Nimkii’s life, this paper will show that literature uses cultural and personal lenses to understand the consequences of genocidal events. The advantages of literature in the ongoing genocide of the Anishnaabe people are multifaceted, far more than an individual narrative like that of Nimkii, but rather is a societal emulating concern. In that, the literature, mainly narratives, such as the Nimkii, offers profound prospects to delve further into the injustices of the past and their impact on current life. Through the exploration of the psychological effects of residential school abuse, the literature provokes readers to admit the systemic violence and trauma inflicted upon indigenous nations. Through complex narrating literary means, the voiceless get the voice to examine the intersectionality of colonialism, cultural annihilation, and genocide. Therefore, through an imaginative reading that moves beyond the mere literal meanings and clear implications of literature, we identify how literature contributes to the promotion of empathy, understanding, and, eventually, meaningful participation in justice and peace. 9 Literature presents a unique standpoint to understand the ramifications of calamitous events such as the Sixties Scoop; it aims to make the reader understand that structural stereotypes and cultural eradication were the legitimacy of those incidents. By applying literature as a lens, we can grasp its interrelatedness with historical trauma, cultural identity, and systemic oppression. Delineating the educational effects of colonial policies on indigenous groups via texts provides a means of evaluating the protracted consequences of removal, family dismemberment, and annihilation as culture. Further, literature probes into topics such as assimilation and cultural survival, allowing for an alternative look at the endurance of indigenous people in the genocides. Thus, by analyzing literature about genocidal events, one comes to appreciate societal structures that have persistently shaped indigenous experiences to the present times. The consequences of literature on the understanding of the present-day Anishnaabe genocide are numerous, such as knowledge more than an individual narrative such as Nimkii’s to the societal aspects. Narrative pedagogy grounded on literature such as Nimkii provides the level of understanding required to recognize, analyze, and address past injustices and their present ramifications. The psychological effects of abuse in residential schools are studied, revealing systematic violence and trauma inflicted on the indigenous people. Literature operates as a priceless lens through which the socio-political ramifications of the genocidal experiences, such as the Sixties Scoop, are interpreted. Authors acquire a greater insight into the normalized injustices and the targeted erasure of culture and identity experienced by indigenous peoples through literary texts. Through the lens of literature, we can perceive how historical trauma, cultural identity, and systemic oppression are interrelated. Colonialism has established a groundwork for the reading of the imprint of invasion, thwarted attempts to launch resistance, separation of families, and cultural genocide in native communities. By examining 10 notions like acculturation and cultural maintenance, literature urges readers to consider the unwavering tenacity of indigenous groups despite the travesty of genocide. As such, by examining the wider social consequences of genocidal occurrences through literature, we obtain a deeper insight into the structural inequalities and injustices that continue to shape contemporary indigenous experiences. The narrative of Nimkii has functioned as a strong focal point through which to address the interval effects of the genocidal acts in regard to the Anishnaabe people. Through the attention he gives to Nimkii’s experiences of abuse in residential schools, the consequences of the Sixties Scoop, and the transmission of traditional beliefs through storytelling, we learn more about the cultural and personal side of the ongoing genocide against indigenous groups. Nimkii interweaves personal and cultural views, bringing to light the long-lasting damage of such genocidal policies while highlighting the unbreakable Anishnaabe spirit. In using a cultural lens, Nimkii highlights the role of storytelling in sustaining indigenous culture and identity. Nonetheless, colonial forces have not dampened Anishnaabe culture, whose rituals have been maintained and passed on from one generation to the next. Such resilience serves as proof of the lasting power of indigenous cultures in the period of crisis. Further, digging into Nimkii’s narrative, this essay has not only widened our knowledge of Anishnaabe culture but also developed our desire to know the views of other indigenous groups on past and present genocidal incidents. Via writing works like “Nimkii,” we are echoed with the relevance of magnifying indigenous voices and stories in our communal effort to deal with historical injustices. Thus, “Nimkii” remains an eloquent testimony of the enduring consequences of genocides for indigenous people in literature. Affected as we are by the aftermath of colonization, it is incumbent upon us to observe the messages embedded within stories similar to 11 that which Nimkii gives and seek justice and reconciliation as we struggle to obtain a better and more inclusive understanding of our history. 12 References Akiwenzie-Damm, K., Howe, J., Storm, J., & Yaciuk, R. (2019). Nimkii. Portage & Main Press.

Humanities Question

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